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But when Ashley asked an innocent question about work, Connor launched into a misogynistic rant in which he called her a “gold-digging whore.” Bumble’s response, a fiery blog post now known as the “Dear Connor” letter, quickly went viral.

The company called for a future in which Connor would “engage in everyday conversations with women without being afraid of their power”—and then, in an unusual move, banned him from using the service.

She sunk into a deep depression and eventually fled Los Angeles for Austin, where she thought she might open a juice bar.

“I read what people were saying about me, and I was sure I was done,” she says.

Whitney Wolfe, Bumble’s 28-year-old founder and CEO, understands how it feels to be on the receiving end of such messages.

The concept of Bizz is a relatively easy sell for current users: Set up a discrete profile for networking, all while continuing under the principle that anyone can match, but women alone can initiate contact.

The rocker admits he has become obsessed with barbecuing in recent years and loves to watch online videos about the perfect cuts and seasoning - and now he's planning to become an all-rounder by learning all about the art of meat.

Like many single millennials, Ashley and Connor met cute the modern way: They matched on Bumble, the dating app where people swipe through potential partners but only women are allowed to initiate a conversation, and started texting.

But this approach also taps into a critical cultural zeitgeist as women push back against the subtle and overt harassment they face in business.

As companies like Uber and Google struggle to overcome public reports of discrimination, a rising cohort of women, from venture capitalists to finance and tech entrepreneurs, are determined to refashion what is acceptable and what is possible in the workplace.

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