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L., XXXIX, 2189, and Pirminius, ibid., LXXXIX, 1034), and it is foreshadowed still earlier in a sermon attributed to St. L., XVII, 671; Kattenbusch, I, 81), which takes notice that the Creed was "pieced together by twelve separate workmen". Although he does not explicitly assign each article to the authorship of a separate Apostle, he states that it was the joint work of all, and implies that the deliberation took place on the day of Pentecost.Moreover, he declares that "they for many just reasons decided that this rule of faith should be called the Symbol", which Greek word he explains to mean both , that is to say an offering made up of separate contributions. 390), the letter addressed to Pope Siricius by the Council of Milan (Migne, P. let credit at least be given to the Symbol of the Apostles which the Roman Church always preserves and maintains inviolate." The word in this sense, standing alone, meets us first about the middle of the third century in the correspondence of St. Firmilia, the latter in particular speaking of the Creed as the "Symbol of the Trinity", and recognizing it as an integral part of the rite of baptism (Migne, P. It should be added, moreover, that Kattenbusch (II, p.Throughout the Middle Ages it was generally believed that the Apostles, on the day of Pentecost, while still under the direct inspiration of the Holy Ghost, composed our present Creed between them, each of the Apostles contributing one of the twelve articles.This legend dates back to the sixth century (see Pseudo-Augustine in Migne, P. L., XXI, 337) gives a detailed account of the composition of the Creed, which account he professes to have received from earlier ages ().Peter and Paul themselves or by their immediate successors, and in the course of time had spread throughout the world.(4) Furthermore note that towards the end of the second century we can extract from the writings of St.Any unauthorized use, without prior written consent of Catholic Online is strictly forbidden and prohibited.

The un- translated Enchiridion lists each work and prayer in alphabetical order by their Latin names. The descriptions of the works and details regarding obtaining the indulgence will be edited and abreviated in this listing.

This fact is full admitted by such Protestant authorities as Harnack (in Hauck's Realencyclopädie, I, 747) and Kattenbusch (I, 380 sq.; II, 194 sqq., and 737 sq.).

It is obvious that these data would harmonize very well with the theory that a primitive Creed had been delivered to the Christian community of Rome, either by Sts.

The following is not represented to be an exact reprint of the Enchiridion but an accurate digest of what constitutes an approved indulgenced work by the Sacred Apostolic Penitentiary.

In all but the plenary indulgence of In Articulo Mortis, at the moment of death, a plenary indulgence mentioned below MUST be accompanied by the three prerequisites of a plenary indulgence.

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